World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Plastic arts

Article Id: WHEBN0000423343
Reproduction Date:

Title: Plastic arts  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: French art, Bili Bidjocka, Conservation and restoration of outdoor artworks, Art world, List of museums in Naples
Collection: Plastic Arts, Visual Arts
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Plastic arts

Plastic arts are art forms which involve physical manipulation of a plastic medium by moulding or modeling such as sculpture or ceramics. The term has also been applied more broadly to all the visual (non-literary, non-musical) arts.[1]

Materials for use in the plastic arts, in the narrower definition, include those that can be carved or shaped, such as stone or wood, Piet Mondrian's concept of "Neoplasticism".

Contents

  • Definitions 1
  • Gallery 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5

Definitions

plastic art:
  1 : art (as sculpture or bas-relief) characterized by modeling : three-dimensional art
  2 : visual art (as painting, sculpture, or film) especially as distinguished from art that is written (as poetry or music) —often used in plural

Therefore, it is safe to say that plastic arts in the narrower sense are those visual arts that involve the use of materials such as clay or plaster, that can be moulded or modulated in some way, often in three dimensions.

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^

Further reading

  • Barnes, A. C., The Art in Painting, 3rd ed., 1937, Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., NY. OCLC 1572753
  • Bukumirovic, D. (1998). Maga Magazinovic. Biblioteka Fatalne srpkinje knj. br. 4. Beograd: Narodna knj.
  • Fazenda, M. J. (1997). Between the pictorial and the expression of ideas: the plastic arts and literature in the dance of Paula Massano. N.p.
  • Gerón, C. (2000). Enciclopedia de las artes plásticas dominicanas: 1844-2000. 4th ed. Dominican Republic s.n.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.