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Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine

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Title: Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine  
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Subject: Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine, Frederick, Duke of Lorraine, 1282 births, 1329 deaths, Dukes of Lorraine
Collection: 1282 Births, 1329 Deaths, Dukes of Lorraine
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Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine

Frederick IV (French: Ferry) (15 April 1282 – 21 April 1329[1]), called the Fighter, was the Duke of Lorraine from 1312 to his death.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Personal life 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Biography

Frederick was born in Gondreville, the son and successor of Theobald II and Isabella of Rumigny.

On 18 October 1314, at the Diet of Frankfurt, the prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire failed to elect as successor to Henry VII, Holy Roman Emperor, either the Habsburg claimant, Frederick the Handsome, the duke of Austria, or the Wittelsbach, Louis IV of Bavaria. By marriage to Elisabeth, daughter of Albert I of Germany, Frederick was the brother-in-law of Frederick the Handsome, called Frederick III of Germany by his supporters, of whom Frederick of Lorraine was one. On 28 September 1322, at the Battle of Mühldorf, both Fredericks were captured. This was an opportunity for Charles IV of France to strengthen the Lorrainer ties to France and he quickly procured the duke's release on the promise that Lorraine would not interfere in imperial affairs.

In 1324, he participated in an expedition in Aquitaine against Edward II of England's estates, for Charles IV had built a fortress illegally on Edward's territory and had sent his uncle, Count Charles III of Valois, against the English possessions after Hugh le Despenser and the Younger Despenser imprisoned Isabella of France, Charles IV's sister and Edward's queen. He took part in the War of Metz in 1325 and 1326. He joined Philip VI of France, Charles of Valois's son, on his succession in 1328 and died in the Battle of Cassel.

Personal life

In 1304, Frederick IV married Elisabeth of Austria (1285–1352), daughter of Albert I of Austria the Emperor. They had the following children:

  • Rudolph (1320–1346), his successor in Lorraine
  • Margaret, married Jean de Chalon, lord of Auberive (died 1350), then Conrad, count of Friburg, and lastly Ulrich (died 1377), lord of Rappoltstein
  • Four children who died during childhood

See also

References

  1. ^ Lorraine Medieval Lands
Preceded by
Theobald II
Duke of Lorraine
1312–1329
Succeeded by
Rudolph
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