Abuse

Abuse is the improper usage or treatment of an entity, often to unfairly or improperly gain benefit.[1] Abuse can come in many forms, such as: physical or verbal maltreatment, injury, assault, violation, rape, unjust practices; crimes, or other types of aggression.

Contents

  • Types and contexts of abuse 1
    • Abuse of authority 1.1
    • Abuse of corpse 1.2
    • Abuse of discretion 1.3
    • Abuse of dominance 1.4
    • Abuse of indulgences 1.5
    • Abuse of information 1.6
    • Abuse of power 1.7
    • Abuse of process 1.8
    • Abuse of rank 1.9
    • Abuse of statistics 1.10
    • Abuse of the system 1.11
    • Abuse of trust 1.12
    • Abusive supervision 1.13
    • Academic abuse 1.14
    • Ad hominem abuse 1.15
    • Adolescent abuse 1.16
    • Adult abuse 1.17
    • Alcohol abuse 1.18
    • Animal abuse 1.19
    • Anti-social behaviour 1.20
    • Bullying 1.21
    • Character assassination 1.22
    • Child abuse 1.23
      • Parental abuse of children 1.23.1
      • Child sexual abuse 1.23.2
        • Child-on-child sexual abuse 1.23.2.1
    • Church abuse 1.24
    • Civil rights abuse 1.25
    • Clandestine abuse 1.26
    • Clerical abuse 1.27
    • Cyber abuse or cyber bullying 1.28
    • Dating abuse or dating violence 1.29
    • Defamation 1.30
    • Detainee abuse 1.31
    • Disability abuse 1.32
    • Discriminatory abuse 1.33
    • Doctor abuse 1.34
    • Domestic abuse or domestic violence 1.35
    • Drug abuse 1.36
    • Economic abuse 1.37
    • Elder abuse 1.38
    • Emotional abuse 1.39
    • Employee abuse 1.40
    • False accusations 1.41
    • Financial abuse 1.42
    • Flag abuse 1.43
    • Gaming the system 1.44
    • Gaslighting 1.45
    • Gay abuse or gay bashing 1.46
    • Group psychological abuse 1.47
    • Harassment 1.48
    • Hate crimes 1.49
    • Hazing 1.50
    • Human rights abuse 1.51
    • Humiliation 1.52
    • Incivility 1.53
    • Institutional abuse 1.54
    • Insult 1.55
    • Intimidation 1.56
    • Legal abuse 1.57
    • Lesbian abuse 1.58
    • Malpractice 1.59
    • Market abuse 1.60
    • Material abuse 1.61
    • Medical abuse 1.62
    • Mental abuse 1.63
    • Military abuse 1.64
    • Mind abuse or mind control 1.65
    • Misconduct 1.66
    • Mobbing 1.67
    • Narcissistic abuse 1.68
    • Neglect 1.69
    • Negligence 1.70
    • Nurse abuse or nursing abuse 1.71
    • Online abuse 1.72
    • Parental abuse by children 1.73
    • Passive–aggressive behaviour 1.74
    • Patient abuse 1.75
    • Peer abuse 1.76
    • Persecution 1.77
    • Personal abuse or personal attacks 1.78
    • Physical abuse 1.79
      • Torture 1.79.1
    • Police abuse 1.80
    • Political abuse 1.81
    • Prejudice 1.82
    • Prison abuse or prisoner abuse 1.83
    • Professional abuse 1.84
    • Psychological abuse 1.85
    • Racial abuse 1.86
    • Ragging 1.87
    • Rape 1.88
    • Relational aggression 1.89
    • Religious abuse 1.90
    • Resident abuse 1.91
    • Rudeness 1.92
    • Satanic ritual abuse 1.93
    • School bullying 1.94
    • Sectarian abuse 1.95
    • Self-abuse 1.96
    • Sexual abuse 1.97
    • Sexual bullying 1.98
    • Sibling abuse 1.99
    • Smear campaign 1.100
    • Societal abuse 1.101
    • Spiritual abuse 1.102
    • Spousal abuse 1.103
    • Stalking 1.104
    • Structural abuse 1.105
    • Substance abuse 1.106
    • Surveillance abuse 1.107
    • Taunting 1.108
    • Teacher abuse 1.109
    • Teasing 1.110
    • Telephone abuse 1.111
    • Terrorism 1.112
    • Transgender abuse or trans bashing 1.113
    • Umpire abuse 1.114
    • Verbal abuse or verbal attacks 1.115
    • Whispering campaign 1.116
    • Workplace abuse or workplace bullying 1.117
  • Characteristics and styles of abuse 2
    • Telltale signs of abuse 2.1
  • Psychological characteristics of abusers 3
  • Effects of abuse on victims 4
  • Power and control in abusive relationships 5
  • Victim blaming 6
  • Cycles of abuse 7
  • Intergenerational transmission of abuse 8
  • Notable abuse cases 9
  • See also 10
  • Notes 11
  • References 12
  • Further reading 13
  • External links 14

Types and contexts of abuse

Abuse of authority

Abuse of authority, in the form of political corruption, is the use of legislated or otherwise authorised powers by government officials for illegitimate private gain. Misuse of government power for other purposes, such as repression of political opponents and general police brutality, is not considered political corruption. Neither are illegal acts by private persons or corporations not directly involved with the government. An illegal act by an officeholder constitutes political corruption only if the act is directly related to their official duties.

Abuse of authority is separated from abuse of power in that the act is originally condoned, but is extended beyond that initially conceived and is in not all cases

Abuse of corpse

See: Abuse of corpse

Abuse of discretion

An abuse of discretion is a failure to take into proper consideration the facts and law relating to a particular matter; an arbitrary or unreasonable departure from precedent and settled judicial custom.[2]

Abuse of dominance

See: Abuse of dominance

Abuse of indulgences

See: Abuse of indulgences

Abuse of information

Abuse of information typically involves a breach of confidence or plagiarism, or extending the confidence of information beyond those authorised.

In the financial world, Insider trading can also be considered a misuse of in