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Technology


Works of technology refer to the making, modification, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, systems, methods of organization, in order to solve a problem, improve a preexisting solution to a problem, achieve a goal or perform a specific function. It can also refer to the collection of such tools, machinery, modifications, arrangements and procedures. Technologies significantly affect human as well as other animal species' ability to control and adapt to their natural environments.

 
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Wright Flyer Paper : Air Force Smart Operations for the Twenty-fir...

By: Major Harold W. Linnean, III, USAFR

Air Force Smart Operations for the Twenty-first Century (AFSO 21) is the Air Force’s initiative to recapitalize funds by maximizing value and minimizing waste in operations. This paper identifies potential failure points associated with the changing Air Force culture. Overall, the Air Force’s change plan appears to be proceeding according to schedule. However, it does not appear that the Air Force is adequately planning for a long-term sustainment of AFSO 21. There is st...

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Wright Flyer Paper : The Acme of Skill; Nonkinetic Warfare, Vol. 30

By: Major Cheng Hang Teo, Republic of Singapore Air Force

After exploring the definitions and theories of nonkinetic warfare, this paper charts the development of warfare in practice and finds that the latest incarnation of warfare, by making the will of the people the primary target, has moved into the nonkinetic realm.

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Wright Flyer Paper : Using an Intratheater Regional Hub Heuristic ...

By: Major Robert L. Charlesworth, USAF

The purpose of this research is to recommend a relaxation of the airlift operations’ doctrinal definition of the hub-and-spoke concept to allow for inclusion of a regional hub in-theater. To justify this recommendation, a case study methodology is used to compare performance of the intratheater airlift channel system as it existed in Iraq in February 2004 to a model channel system created using a regional hub heuristic. The two channel systems are compared using dependen...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Fighting the War above Iraq; Employing Space ...

By: Major James A. Oldenburg, USAF

This paper shows that in Operation Iraqi Freedom, and other counterinsurgency operations, space forces will not be “war winners” but can provide crucial support. Specifically, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities can help isolate the battlespace. These systems can also enhance the ability to combat fielded rebels through surveillance, reconnaissance, and communications. Finally, the effects space forces generate can support the government and help strengthen its ...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Back to the Basics; An Aviation Solution to C...

By: Major Arthur D. Davis, USAF

In this paper, I seek to demonstrate that the methods of using airpower to take the fight to the enemy and protect our ground forces during small wars need not involve the most advanced aircraft available. This “low-tech” approach does not suggest using lesser technology per se but proposes a different look for the types of aircraft that can perform a specific mission and for their manner of employment—that of protecting ground forces while combating the elusive insurgen...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Looking Skyward; The Emergence of an Air-Mind...

By: Major Ronald G. Machoian, USAF

This brief study of the earliest American Airmen and their influence on the development of an air-minded culture is a work in progress.

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Wright Flyer Paper : Electronic Combat Support for an Expeditionar...

By: LCDR James C. Rentfrow, USN

Why was the United States Air Force (USAF) so resistant to the idea of dedicated suppression of enemy air defenses and electronic countermeasures support for its strikers? Why had they given the electronic combat (EC) mission almost entirely to the Navy? Was the technology of stealth really the driving force, or was there more? They needed money and technology to make them work. In short, I found the four elements of the model I propose in this paper.

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Wright Flyer Paper : Identifying and Mitigating the Risks of Cockp...

By: Maj Wesley A. Olson, USAF

This paper provides a brief summary of the direct costs associated with automation. It also provides a framework for designers, managers, and pilots in implementing measures to mitigate these costs. Safety improvements are not the province of any one of these groups. Instead, an integrated effort between these communities is necessary to promote aviation safety. I have assumed that the reader has a working knowledge of glass cockpit aircraft as well as a basic understand...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Fatigue Management for Aerospace Expeditionar...

By: Major Michael A. LeClair, USAF

Having flown in a single-seat cockpit more than 14 hours deploying to Southwest Asia, I am familiar with the negative effects of long duration flights as well as the impact transmeridian sorties have on an aircrew’s circadian rhythm. Any attempt to make that experience less painful for the aviators climbing into their jets during future deployments deserves pursuit and further investigation. Unfortunately, a great deal of the information available for the operational air...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Rapid Dominance Integrating Space Into Today'...

By: Maj Mark E. Harter, USAF

Control of the vertical dimension—air and space—is essential to preserving healthy commerce and situational awareness during peacetime and sustaining military operations during conflict. Air and space forces must be integrated in order to achieve rapid dominance of the battle space when necessary. While airpower has existed for almost a century, military space operations are yet in their infancy. Military leaders, planners, and operators are just beginning to recognize t...

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Wright Flyer Paper : Center of Gravity or Center of Confusion Unde...

By: Maj Seow Hiang Lee, Republic of Singapore Air Force

My interest in the center of gravity (COG) concept began in the Republic of Singapore when I noticed with some amusement that a concept which purports to help campaign planners focus their main effort can be embroiled in such controversy and confusion. I attempt to unravel some of the mystique that surrounds the employment of the COG concept. Hopefully, by drawing out the potential sources of confusion that often accompany the use of the concept, we can soften the diffic...

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Wright Flyer Paper : The Role of Airpower in Urban Warfare An Airm...

By: Timothy L. Saffold

This research project addresses how I believe airpower should be employed in urban warfare to achieve operational and strategic results. I chose this topic because there is an apparent disconnection between how military planners and operators view urban combat and their awareness of airpower’s unique and potentially decisive contributions in this environment. This disconnect could prove disastrous for military forces operating on urban terrain. Urban warfare has been giv...

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C-130 Programmed Depot Maintenance

By: Major John A. Daniels, USAF

This paper examines the current USAF criteria for inducting C-130 aircraft into programmed depot maintenance (PDM) based on the mission, design, and series (MDS) of the aircraft. An alternative approach using an analytical model is developed in an attempt to refine the current process.

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A Cyberspace Command and Control Model

By: Colonel Joseph H. Scherrer, USAF; Lieutenant Colonel William C. Grund, USAF

The authors assert that the lack of an effective cyberspace C2 structure critically reduces the responsiveness to combatant and joint task force commanders and increases the difficulty of integrating cyberspace capabilities into operational plans and execution. The traditional military hierarchies currently used for cyberspace C2 do not have the agility to deal with the high velocity of change that characterizes cyberspace. Instead, the authors argue for flexible organiz...

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Red Is Good : Transformational Changes for US Air Force Aircraft M...

By: Colonel Paul J. Mcaneny, USAF

Colonel Paul “P. J.” McAneny offers an analysis focused on aircraft maintenance but applicable to the entire force and recommends cultural changes to support lasting transformation. He examines the impact of metrics on transformation and evaluates the USAF aircraft maintenance culture. He asks several questions: Can focused metrics precede cultural change? Does the aircraft maintenance community support a Red Is Good culture, in which metrics are used to illuminate probl...

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Missile Defensive Systems and the Civil Reserve Air Fleet

By: Lieutenant Colonel Glen R. Downing, USAF

One of the United States’ greatest military advantages is rapid global mobility. The Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) provides a crucial supplement to the military’s mobility resources in time of war or national emergency. The proliferation of man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS), however, poses a growing threat to the CRAF and its critical airlift capacity. In this study, Lt Col Glen Downing describes the US government’s historical and potential future uses of the C...

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Spectrum Management : Key to the Future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems?

By: Lieutenant Colonel Mary E. Griswold, USAF

In this paper, Lt Col Mary E. Griswold discusses the basics of the electromagnetic spectrum and UAS operations, pointing out how frequency management and bandwidth availability are key to UAS operations. She illustrates this through examples of difficulties encountered during military operations with spectrum and bandwidth issues. Finally, she notes that solutions to the current challenges are found in the employment of both short- and long-term actions in these areas to...

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Integration of Weaponized Unmanned Aircraft into the Air-to-Ground...

By: Lieutenant Colonel David B. Hume, USAF

In this paper, Col David B. Hume, who served as an expeditionary air support operation group commander in Operation Iraqi Freedom, explores some of the mission employment and doctrinal issues associated with this emerging weapons system and argues that weaponized unmanned aircrafts should be commanded and controlled just like close-air-support (CAS) assets.

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Air Force Intelligence Role in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction

By: Cristina M. Stone Lieutenant Colonel, USAF

In this paper Lt Col Cristina M. Stone argues that the Air Force does not adequately prepare its intelligence analysts; targeteers; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) operators; and unit-level and air and space operations center (AOC) personnel with the knowledge and expertise required to fill these positions. The author recommends that the Air Force leverage its technical and scientific core and expert organizations across the government to improve tra...

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Near Space : Should Air Force Space Command Take Control of Its Shore?

By: Lieutenant Colonel Kurt D. Hall, USAF

Gen John P. Jumper, former Air Force chief of staff, tasked Air Force Space Command with the responsibility of developing, fielding, and executing tactical and operationally responsive space capabilities near and through space. The newly created initiative known as Joint Warfighting Space focused on near space due to the advantage of achieving spacelike capabilities at a lower cost. Such capabilities could offer continuous, organic, survivable, and “stay and stare” persi...

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